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Everything Else Fabulous

    Everything Else Fabulous

    Why I Feel Such a Loss over Anthony Bourdain’s Suicide

    National Suicide Prevention Line Call 1-800-273-8255

    Why I feel such a loss over Anthony Bourdain’s Suicide.

    National Suicide Prevention Line Call 1-800-273-8255.

    I worshiped him.

    Hung on his words.

    Watched him mature.

    I was proud of his open admission to substance abuse and recovery.

    I loved his travel ethic. His clear understanding of how intricately linked food is to culture.

    He seemed sincere. Kind. Understood the power he wielded without ego or arrogance.

    You’d think we were best friends.  Of course we never met.  The closest I ever got to Anthony
    Bourdain was Row 50 of the Paramount Theatre in Seattle when he and Mario Batali entertained an audience of admirers.

    Why I feel such a loss of Anthony Bourdain’s suicide – I felt like I knew him personally.  I often half jokingly said Bourdain for President in 2020. Maybe I was more serious than joking.  In my eyes he was everything I wanted to be; a talented writer and storyteller, an incredible chef, a conscientious and thoughtful traveler, smart, witty, empathetic and unconcerned about what others thought of him.

    But was he all these things?  Or was it part of the act? What demons possessed him to take his own life, at the height of his career? With a beautiful little daughter?  Loved and respected by millions the world over?  Is keeping up appearances for celebrities just too hard in this age of non-stop media?

    I think he may have been conflicted about his celebrity – because essentially it goes against many of his beliefs.  Should chefs be like rock stars? Does promoting travel to remote places around the world cause too much stress on these places and change them? Did he feel guilty?  Did he think he wasn’t worthy of his unbridled success?

    Was it just all too much? Clearly it was. And it’s why I feel such a loss over Anthony Bourdain’s suicide.

    I am not a clinical psychiatrist, a mental health professional or a doctor of any kind.  I’m just a fan who feels stricken that for Anthony Bourdain there was a burden, whatever it was, he could no longer bear.

    Why?

    The United States has a crisis on its hands.  And although celebrity suicides bring this issue of suicide to light in the media, the real crazy thing is the number of suicides we never hear about.

    In 2016 (the last year that statistics are available) 45,000 people committed suicide in the United States.  That’s 124 PER DAY!  And thousands more, thankfully, attempted but failed to commit suicide.

    Washington State, where I am sitting writing this blog today, ranks 26th in the United States for suicides.  Montana is number one.

    I don’t have the answers.  I just have the questions.  And a heavy heart.  My hero is gone – and I feel the loss.

     

    New York Times Article about suicide in the USA

    American Foundation for Suicide Prevention and Suicide Statistics

    National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

    Call 1-800-273-8255

     

     

     

     

    Everything Else Fabulous

    Age Perception is a Funny Thing

    Back in the USA and These Things Are on My Mind

    Age perception is a funny thing.  When you were 40 years old and your parent turned 60 they seemed so ancient.  In two weeks my husband hits the big 6-0 and he is certainly not ancient.

    When I was 35 my baby brother passed away at 32.  Of course he seemed very young to die, but recently my family lost my cousin, also 32 and she seems like a child to me now that I am 58.  Gone way to soon.

    I was thinking the other day about my teachers in grade school.  When I was a kid I had some great teachers, but of course they all seemed old to me.  I was a kid.  They were grownups.  When you are little grownups all seem old.

    Age perception is a funny thing. As we mature we look at age so differently.  I have never been afraid to grow old, but I certainly make a constant effort to keep my body in condition and be as healthy as I can.  Because at this time in my life I am acutely aware of people my age and younger who are passing away – some after a long illness while others very suddenly.

    Today I look at my parents in their 80’s and am thankful they are still here, and hope they have a lot of years left.  I think about celebrating their fiftieth birthdays and it seems like yesterday.

    Age perception is a funny thing.  Maturity definitely sheds a different light on life, age and longevity.  But we live and learn don’t we?  And I’d rather be growing old than not at all.

    No regrets.

     

     

     

    Everything Else Fabulous

    Reveling in Reunions

    Back in the USA and Reveling in Reunions

    We have been back in the USA for two weeks today. And we have been in constant motion. For us the 18 months we were traveling outside the USA flew by.  But to people we know back home they felt like we were gone for a decade.

    We weren’t.  Just 18 months.

    Reveling in reunions

    The Martini Mamas

    And yet, on our first return to our home country we find ourselves caught up in a myriad of reunions, nearly every day.  I told my husband I thought the demand on us was mostly because of the novelty of our adventures.  I think by the time we return again for a visit next year, that novelty will have worn off.

    Reveling in Reunions

    Book Club Babes

    Please don’t misunderstand.  I LOVE all these reunions.  We are having such a great time getting re-acquainted with our loved ones. We had a big reunion with my husband’s family right away.  And I have spent individual time with my parents.  Our oldest son

    Reveling in Reunions

    The Lund Family

    Reveling in reunions

    Lifelong Friends

    has been here at our house several times and we went to Seattle yesterday and toured the brand new Nordic Museum with our youngest son.  We are doing our best to work around our kids work schedules so we can spend as much time with them as possible.

    I spent four days in Nashville with my girlfriends from high school and we had another lovely reunion last Friday night with some of our oldest friends who we have known most of our lives.

    Reveling in reunions

    Yard work with my Mom

    I loved seeing the wonderful ladies of my book club as well as my dear girl friends who are known as the Martini Mamas.  I’m lunching with other friends, meeting for coffee with others and having wine with still more.  Next Sunday we head to Zion for a reunion with Arne’s college friends. Lucky me.

    Reveling in Reunions

    My son Erik

    During the time we are here in the USA I’m spending every Tuesday with my Dad (as well as other days).  We have had lunch together and we brought him from his assisted living home to have dinner at our house.  I’m spending every Wednesday with my Mom.  So far I’ve helped her in her yard, but she and I have plans to do several girl things together from crafts to Ride the Ducks in Seattle.

    Arne is also spending every Wednesday with his Mom.  They went for a walk, he did yard work and they are attending the Seattle Mariners games.

    Reveling in reunions

    My friends from high school

    As we plan to continue to travel for an undetermined amount of time, spending these eleven weeks here in the USA soaking up our family and friends is our goal. The time will fly and we will be off again before we

    Reveling in reunions

    Dinner with son Dane

    know it.  But then, I expect that time will also fly, and a year from now we will be back again.  Back and forth – we see this as our way of life for at least a few more years. A grand adventure to see the world, while we can. How fabulous!

    We leave again on August 7th – details on that coming soon.

    Everything Else Fabulous

    We are Back

    The Weird and Wonderful World of the USA

    Location: Gig Harbor Washington USA

    And We Are Back – Adjusting to being back in the fast paced USA.

    It’s both wonderful and weird being back here.  It’s surreal and my husband and I keep looking at each other with a perplexed look – “was it always this “wired”?”  Fast paced and a bit maniacal, we haven’t felt this in a while.  But here we are and it will be like any other country we visit – spend sometime getting into the swing and then we will feel right at home.  At least the language is familiar!  Oh and the money is green – the way it should be. And there is toilet paper!! Woohoo!

    For those of you who are personal friends and family, we hope to see as many of you as possible.   Please note however that we are holding the majority of our time open for our family; particularly our aging parents and our adult children.  But we still do hope to see our friends and we have many dinners and lunches and coffees and glasses of wine already on the calendar with our dearest peeps.  But other than a quick reunion trip to both Nashville with my high school girlfriends(leaving today) and Utah (college buddies) in June, we will stay mostly on the Kitsap Peninsula during our visit.

    We are staying in the home of our friends in downtown Gig Harbor while they are off in their RV for two months.  This is from May 14-July 15.  On July 15th we move to another home in Seabeck to be a closer to Arne’s family for our final three weeks.  We depart the USA again on August 7th and plan to be away this time for nine to ten months. More on that later.

    But for now we try to catch our breath, squeeze our loved ones, and remember to drive on the right hand side of the road!

    So hello USA, Washington, Kitsap Peninsula and Gig Harbor.  Hello, Susaday, Hafa Adai, Apa Kabar, Kihineh, Sabaidi, Swasdi, G’Day, Zdraveite, Zdravo, Xin Chao, Namaste, Chomreabsuro, Vanakkam, Is-Slama, Om suastiastu, Huh-low, Ssalamu, Sawubona, Salam-Alai Kum, Bom Dia, Bon Jour, Kia Ora, Hola, ‘Lekum, Aloha. Hello!

    Everything Else Fabulous

    Cruising Then and Now

    Many Changes in Cruising Since our First Cruise 26 Years Ago

    Location: Onboard Explorer of the Seas

    When we booked the cruise we are on, we were under the false assumption that repositioning cruises were not all that popular.  That could not be farther from the truth.  This 23 day cruise has been interesting to say the least.  We have learned a lot about the world of cruise fanatics and cruise loyalty.

    At the pool. There are three pools.

    Onboard this ship are people who love to cruise.  I call them serial cruisers. I over heard one women bragging that this was her 83rd cruise.  It’s very clear from people we have met that cruising for the majority of these hard-core cruise junkies is all about being on the ship and very little about the destinations.  It’s also clear that most the people on the ship are loyal to Royal Caribbean and their frequent cruiser programs.  Royal Caribbean family if you will.

    Lunch at the buffet

    Eighty Three cruises?  No thanks.  I enjoy cruising but only every few years and certainly never feel like I can really get to know a destination with only 8 hours in port.  But on this cruise I am clearly in the minority – in more ways than one.  I frequently mention how often Arne and I find we are older than other travelers  meet. Not on this ship. Not even close.

    It’s been 26 years since I took my first cruise, a Caribbean seven-day cruise out of Puerto Rico.  I’ve now done a total of nine cruises, nowhere near

    Kitchen prep in the galley

    the number of some of the people onboard with us on the Explorer of the Seas.  But averaging one cruise every three years I have seen some very clear changes in the industry of cruising since that first one long ago.  Not only has the industry of cruising changed, but cruising has changed the world.  Places like Venice Italy, Dubrovnik Croatia and Juneau Alaska now scramble to deal with the influx of visitors and the changes, often negative, that cruise ships and cruise passengers can cause.

    From a guests perspective, I have observed the following significant changes in 26 years;

    Daily towell animals in our room 

    Service on board – my first cruise was a dream because of the phenomenal service we received from every staff person onboard but most especially from our room steward and our dining room wait staff.

    Today the staff on board the mega cruise ships are great, but they are clearly overworked and the service is good, often very good, but never to the level of that first cruise I took those many years ago.  It’s clear the service staff is responsible for more guests now than back then, but also some of the lower level of service might be as a result of the pre-paid gratuity.  Our early cruises were back in the day when you handed cash to your wait staff and your room steward at the end of the cruise.  Your choice of gratuity was dependent on the service they provided.  Today, most cruises (most but not all) do a prepaid 18% gratuity when you sign up for your cruise.  Of course the staff knows this.

    Dessert in the main dining room

    Little things have changed in the dining room to create less work for the staff at the expense of the guest.  They used to come around to the table with your salad dressing choices and spoon it directly on your salad for you.  Now you take what they give you.  There used to be a wine steward who would come around and discuss wine choices with you and regions and styles of wine.  On this cruise we are on there has not been a wine steward anywhere in sight.

    Windows getting washed

    Once upon a time the midnight buffet was a highlight of your day and usually included a spectacular ice sculpture.  Since the ships now all have a full-time buffet in addition to the regular dining room, the midnight buffet has disappeared and along with it the entertaining spectacle it always was. 

    The atrium

    Back in the day the cruise line did not nickel and dime you for every little thing.  Today a cup of coffee is free, but not an espresso or a latte.  You also no longer get soda for free.  It used to be only alcohol was extra.  No longer.  In fact you used to enjoy a lobster dinner one night on each cruise but today it’s an extra $35 if you want lobster.  Today you pay extra for “speciality dinning” and even room service has a service charge.  We used to order room service breakfast and enjoy it on our balcony.  But anything “cooked” is a charge so the only breakfast you can get from room service for free is cereal and fruit and coffee.

    Today you have to sign away your first-born before you can get a pool towel, and if it’s not returned by the end of the cruise you will be charged $25 per towel.

    Shore excursions have always been expensive and we avoid doing them most of the time.  The cost has risen extensively over the years and rarely does the cost equal the value.

    Enjoying formal night

    On our first few cruises there wasn’t even a spa or a gym.  I remember running or walking on the promenade deck as exercise.  Today you aren’t allowed to run on the promenade deck because it will make noise in the rooms below.  The new ships have a running track, but it’s nine laps for one mile so you feel a bit like a hamster.  On our first cruise I remember doing morning aerobics class in the dining room and they just pushed the tables and chairs out-of-the-way.  On our first few cruises there was a ‘beauty parlor” but no spa.  Today the spa and fitness center make big bucks for the cruise lines and there is a constant push to buy products that will change your skin, your fitness and your life – at exorbitant prices of course.  In fact this is the first cruise we have been on where we had to pay for certain fitness classes.  Some classes are free still, but the very popular spinning class and yoga class will cost $12.

    Leaving Sydney Harbour

    Twenty-six years ago our first cruise was on a smaller ship than the one we are on now (3500 passengers) and there was only one dinner seating.  You also had a lunch and breakfast seating.  Today most of the time the dining room is closed for breakfast and lunch except on at sea days and you take your breakfast and lunch in the buffet.  I remember on one cruise there was a special evening with a midnight buffet served in the ships galley.  It was a wonderful way to see the sparkling clean kitchen and how the crew prepares so much food for so many guests for so many days.

    In fact, on several early cruises we took “behind the scenes” tours of the galley and the bridge.  Today it will cost you $89 to take the two-hour tour and see the inner workings of the Explorer of the Sea.

    Celebrating the moment we crossed the equator

    Long before we ever did our first cruise we were in the Bahamas in 1982.  Our friends who had just gotten married were on a cruise and in port so we hooked up and actually went on board as guests to see the ship.  That would never happen today.  The ships are very tight with security and just like at the airport you are screened and your bags are scanned each and every time you leave or come back on  board.  There are absolutely no guests.  In addition the cruise lines now make a big push about cleanliness, sanitation and hand washing in an effort to eliminate the dreaded norovirus and other fast spreading viruses on a ship with so many people.

    Today’s ships are spectacular floating cities and many serial cruisers are more interested in what ship they are on and not the destination.  We have met many people who don’t even get off the ship in port.  They love cruising and being on board more than the ports of call.  

    Vanuatu

    These floating cities today have wonderful entertainment staff who make sure there is something for you to do every minute of every day.  If that is what you want.  Throughout the ship there are bars and music, bingo and trivia, lectures and movies, dancing and pool games and of course the nightly entertainment.  They nightly entertainment has improved tremendously over our years of cruising.  On our very first cruise there was no theater.  Instead there was a nightly show in the lounge.  The entertainment was very old-fashioned and for Arne and I (in our early thirties) laughable.  I remember one night was a harmonica player.  Seriously.

    The Palace Theatre

    Today the big ships with their big theaters put on big show, with outstanding singers, dancers, costumes and sets.  Royal Caribbean still maintains a live orchestra as part of the shows (few other cruise lines do).  In addition our cruise has included a visiting performers who presented a fabulous program of “Queen” songs, a vocalist from Australia, an impressionist from the UK, as well as a pianist, a comedian and a hypnotist.  All professional and very entertaining.  And there isn’t is an ice rink on board with its in cast and performances. Amazing  Such an improvement over the old days.  Now if the cruise lines start charging for guests to enjoy the shows then I will probably give up cruising all together.

    Embarkation day in Sydney

    Still on average, cruising is a very inexpensive way to travel.  This 23 day cruise works out to be around $130 per person per day.  That is $30 per person over our daily budget goal, but we can justify because of other places we have traveled where we were way under budget.  It’s easy to see why so many people choose to only travel this way; unpack once, everything is done for you, relatively safe and definitely all the comforts of home.  I suspect we will cruise again  (in fact going with Arne’s Mom on the Panama Canal next year) but it will never be the only way we travel.  There are just too many off the beaten track places to see, and you can’t possibly see them from a ship.  But to each his own.  

    We have enjoyed our time aboard the Explorer of the Sea.  Now it’s time to enjoy being back in the USA.

    Everything Else Fabulous

    What’s in My Suitcase? My Travel Favorites

    What I Won’t Leave Home Without

    Location: In My Suitcase

    When we head off again in August for another year of travel our suitcase will not look the same as when we left the first time 18 months ago.  We have learned what works, what doesn’t and what are our favorite things.  So here are some of my travel favorites in my suitcase.

    Battery Power Pack – possibly our most used and most valuable item. Mophie is the brand we have and we spent $40 on it. We use it everyday  it fits in a purse or pocket and holds a charge for several days. Definitely one of my travel favorites in my suitcase.

    Packing cubes – not sure how I traveled all those years without packing cubes because they are now my best friend.  Especially as a fulltime traveler it’s so great to keep kinds of clothes and other items categorized in my suitcase.

    Cooler – our collapsible portable lunchbox size Igloo cooler was a gift from our niece and it is just perfect for our travel life, picnics and beach days.   We have even used it to keep things (Mayo, cheese, eggs) cold as we traveled by car from one lodging to the next. A very handy item and portable and one of my travel favorites in my suitcase.

    Ice pack – purchased for $2 this ice pack fits perfect in our little cooler and really changed the way we travel.  Such a simple item with a big impact.

    Freezer Bags and trash bags – with endless uses for storage and packing we have used gallon size freezer bags and kitchen size trash bags to keep things dry, to keep things wet, to organize, to protect and to store. From wet shoes to dirty clothes and olive oil to medicines plastic bags make our life easier.

    Notecards and post it notes – having a package of notecards with envelopes and post-it notes has come in handy. I like to leave notes for our Airbnb hosts or tuck notes in a package I’m mailing or a multitude of other uses these small and simple items are one of my travel favorites in my suitcase.

    Packing tape – our roll of packing tape has done a lot more than wrap up boxes.  We used it to fix a splintered iPhone cord and to make a cardboard sleeve for our butcher knife. We repaired a book binding and even a hat.

    Clothes pens – I initially packed these to use on the Camino but they have come in handy in so many ways.  As hangers when we don’t have any, to secure and close bags, to hold back mosquito netting on beds and to of course hang our laundry.

    Manicure kit – it’s not always easy to find a place to have a manicure, and I’ve learned over the years I need to care frequently for my nails or they get cracked and nasty.  So I carry a small manicure kit that serves my needs while on the road.  It takes no room at all and is one of my travel favorites in my suitcase.

    Scrabble – since leaving the USA in November 2016 we have played more than 400 games of Scrabble. Wow that sounds crazy!  But we love the game and the only problem is we are now both really good at it and we find ourselves occasionally in a bit of a stalemate!

    Noise cancelling headphones – this is Arne’s Favorite item on this list.  We both have Bose headphones we use on the plane. Arne also uses his sometimes to listen to music off his iPad or watch movies.  He votes this as his travel favorite in his suitcase.

    French Press – we added a French Press about half way and it recently broke BUT we love having one and will be getting another.  Almost all the places we stay have a hot water pot and we love to make French Press each morning instead of drinking the usual Nescafé.  Traveling with a French Press is one of my travel favorites in my suitcase.

    Foldaway daypack – A few months into our journey we added this item and have used it a ton. It folds up into a little square but when open it is perfect for hikes or city walks when we want to carry a sweater, beach towels, water or just about anything for the day.

    There are things we have been carrying that we don’t plan to include any longer. This includes our kitchen knives, chess board, hiking poles, chamois towel and our giant toilette bag.  I plan to buy a smaller toilette bag and force myself to carry less.

    I’ll hold on to a few tried and true clothing items but plan to throw out many things and replace them with new, Comfy, loose-fitting clothes in mix and match colors.  I clearly know what works and what doesn’t now,  and I think I can bring fewer items while feeling like I have more.  It’s a challenge I am looking forward to.

    What’s in my suitcase? My travel favorites, the bare necessities and the tried and true.

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    Everything Else Fabulous

    When Are You Coming Home and Other Hard to Answer Questions of a Travel Nomad

    On The Grand Adventure

    Location: Planet Earth

    We constantly are dealing with hard to answer questions to a travel nomad life. Always well-meaning, but often difficult to respond, we swim around for a truthful answer that will satisfy the queries.

    After 18 months out of the United States our next stop has us spending two and a half months in our birthplace country.  But it’s not our home.  Even though my passport says United States of

    Hard to answer questions to a travel nomad

    Camino

    America, my home is wherever I am today.

    So answering the often asked question “When are you coming home?” is a tricky one for us.  This question and a handful of others like it, often make us pause.  How to explain this nomad life to non-nomads is difficult.  Putting into words why we are mostly content being vagabonds in our fabulous

    Hard to answer questions to a travel nomad

    Maldives

    fifties is a challenge.  We of course are polite, but when you get asked for the one hundredth time one of the hard to answer questions to a travel nomad, you try being clever and witty.  Try.

    When are you coming home?  Someday we will again have a home in the traditional sense of the word.  But home for us is wherever we are each and every day.  Yes our family and most of our friends are back in the great state of Washington, where we will visit and enjoy ourselves this

    Hard to answer questions to a travel nomad

    India

    summer.  But it’s not our home.  Being homeless is not for everyone.  But for now it works for us. My friend Marty recently gave us a wonderful complement.  She observed that many people talk about doing what we do, but few can pull the trigger and make it happen.  A most flattering thing to say to us.

    It’s also difficult to answer the question “what is your favorite place?’.  We get asked this one ALOT! I think it’s the most often asked question – but most of the time people ask it because they feel a need to ask SOMETHING – even if they really aren’t interested. And we know many people aren’t interested.  We are cognizant of the fact a lot of people don’t actually care about our grand adventure.  If they care they are probably following the blog. If they ask we answer.  Otherwise we don’t share – we understand everyone has their own life.

    When we tell people we don’t have a favorite place we

    Hard to answer questions to a travel nomad

    Vietnam

    often get an eyeball roll.  But we don’t.  We have liked certain places more than others, but there really isn’t anywhere we disliked and everywhere we have been there has been good and bad.

    How can you afford to travel full-time?  We dread this question because the underlying question

    Hard to answer questions to a travel nomad

    Seychelles

    really is “are you rich?”.  No we are not rich.  But what we are is frugal.  Very frugal.  As well as organized and careful and committed to staying within our budget.  Remember we sold everything we own before we left the USA.  We have zero debt, zero bills and live a simple life on a simple budget.  We spend considerably less now than we did living in the USA.  Anyone who is willing to give up their mortgage, car payment, car insurance, boat, house repairs and maintenance, clothing purchases, hair and beauty expenses, gym membership, theatre Hard to answer questions to a travel nomadseason tickets, daily Starbucks visit, clubs and societies, extravagant evenings out and a host of other expenses some American’s often cling to – anyone willing to give that all up, can join us as nomads extremely affordably.  And in our case, be happier than ever before.

    Yet that said, we do get travel fatigue.  I actually avoid mentioning travel fatigue, because there are some people on my Facebook page (masquerading as friends) who are snarky when I mention something like the fact that a life of full-time travel is sometimes, exhausting.  Those are the

    5

    Australia

    Hard to answer questions to a travel nomad

    Sri Lanka

    people who do the eye roll thing and say things like “Oh poor you.  Traveling around the world is so tough”.  You know the type, jealous maybe or unhappy in their own life situation  – I’m sure you have those same people on Facebook.  I don’t want to sound whiney, so I don’t talk about the fatigue very often. But yes it’s tiring.  A few things in particular cause travel fatigue. For instance wishing for a perfect cozy chair to read in.  The constant hunt for ingredients.  Why isn’t there ever toilet paper? Packing and unpacking.  So when I get the question “what is the most

    Hard to answer questions to a travel nomad

    Koh Samui Thailand

    difficult?” I will always say, living out of a suitcase causes me fatigue.

    People often ask us if Arne and I get tired of spending so much time together.  I think this is a funny question because it could really backfire.  This hard to answer question to a travel nomad

    Hard to answer questions to a travel nomad

    Portugal

    might end up with the answer “Yes! We are sick of each other! We are getting divorced”.  Lol.  Of course the answer is the opposite, we get along better now than we ever have in our 35 years of marriage. And we believe that is partly from lack of stress, lack of financial  burden and lack of RAIN!

    Another question we often get is “Aren’t you afraid?”.  Of what exactly?  Living?  No I am not afraid to live.  I am not afraid to die.  I have never felt in danger anywhere, any more than I do in the USA.  I believe this question comes from people

    Hard to answer questions to a travel nomad

    Angor Wat Cambodia

    who believe, naively, that they are safer in the USA than they are traveling outside of it.  When the reality is the opposite.  Ask any high school teacher in the USA how safe they feel?  Really.

    Several people have asked if I plan to write a book. That is not something I’ve given any thought to.  There are many travel nomads before us who have written books but my blog serves as a journal of sorts and for now that’s enough for me.

    Hard to answer questions to a travel nomad

    The family last Christmas in Thailand

    Even though I’ve written this blog I fully expect the need to answer these questions from family and friends while we are in the USA this summer.  And that’s okay.  We are happy to answer any and all questions, particularly if we can encourage and inspire other people to step out of their comfort zone, stop hiding behind the American flag, and go learn and experience the incredible and amazing cultures of the world.  You will be a better person, and the world will be a

    Hard to answer questions to a travel nomad

    Doha Qatar

    better place if you do.

    So ask me anything – including the hard to answer questions to a travel nomad. I will give you the truth.  Nomad life is amazing.  Absolutely fabulous.  Join us.

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