Follow:
Topics:
Browsing Tag:

Delicious

    Fab North America Travel

    Nashville For First Timers

    What a Fabulous City

    Location: Nashville Tennessee USA

    Nashville for first timers

    Breakfast at Bisquit Love

    Nashville for first timers. Not what I was expecting. What a wild place – crazy, historic, loud, interesting and delicious. Nashville for first timers can be a bit of a surprise though. At least it was for me!

    Nashville for first timers

    Famous Jacks BBQ on Broadway

    My high school girl friends and I went a bit rogue this time in choosing our destination for our (almost) annual girls get away.  Nashville made the cut and eight of us put on our mud kickers and headed out for a country music weekend.

    We stayed at the Sheraton Grand Hotel. Unfortunately we didn’t realize how spread out this city is. So my first bit of advice is be prepared to need to Uber and cab it all over town. We spent a ton of money on that – big surprise there. So if you are a Nashville for first timers virgin be prepared!

    Nashville for first timers

    Visiting Antique Archeology

    The Old Town Hop On Hop Off  Trolley was a good investment though when you are doing Nashville for first timers. We bought the first day ticket for $35 and added the second day for an additional $10.  I really loved the drivers of these trolleys who gave us great history, interesting stories all served up with southern charm and humor.

    One of my favorite things we did from the Hop On Hop Off was visit the famous and historic Ryman Theatre where The Grand Ole Opry performed from for many decades. The theatre is really amazing and the tour was was interesting.

    Nashville for first timers

    Historic Ryman Theatre

    Nashville for first timers

    Nelson Greenbrier Distillery

    Also I loved our visit to the historic Marathon Motor Company building. Today it’s filled with funky shops including the Antique Archeology of American Pickers fame. Also on this same block is the Nelson Greenbrier Whiskey Distillery.  The $11 tour was really fascinating and included a tasting of four different spirits they distill.

    From the Hop on Hop Off we also found Music Row fascinating and surprising how these famous recording studios are mostly in tiny houses and not in huge skyscrapers.

    Blake Shelton’s brand new Ole Red bar on Broadway

    The Honky Tonk scene on Broadway in downtown Nashville is way crazier than I imagined. It was Las Vegas with the volumn turned up to eleven. Wild. Thousands and thousands of people, hundreds and hundreds of bars and restaurants and every single one has live music blasting all day long.

    Apparently Nashville is the number one destination in the USA for bachelorette parties. Young scantily clad brides and bridesmaid groups are whooping it up on the sidewalks, in the back of rented flatbeds and open top busses and on the cycle beer trucks. Loud and ready to party. Wow.

    Nashville for first timers

    With my friends at The Grand Ole Opry Hotel

    We took an Uber 20 minutes out to the Gaylord
    Grand Ole Opry Hotel. This is also the place where the Grand Ole  Opry now has its home. But the 3000 room hotel is a destination in itself. Again I was reminded of Vegas – ornate and over the top with waterfalls, jungles, orchids and a riverboat cruise.

    Nashville for first timers

    Country Music Hall Of Fame

    Nashville knows it’s audience and country music fans are very loyal to this town. Fans can spend hours or days at the Country Music Hall Of Fame as well as many other museums including Johnny Cash, Patsy Cline, George Jones and others. Tennessee was also home to three US Presidents (Jackson, Johnson, Polk)and the area around Nashville is full of history relevant to our country.

    Nashville for first timers

    Corn Cakes at the historic Woolworth’s

    I ate a ton – everything from corn cakes to steak, hot chicken, biscuits and macaroni and cheese. Southern comfort food as well as delicious alternatives are in abundance in this town of abundance.

    You can spend a weekend or stay a week and still never see and do everything here.  It’s a great town – alive! Nashville for first timers or do it again? So much fun!

    Y’all should come now ya hear?

    Fab Asia Travel  --  Fab Food

    The Flavors of Bali

    Cooking Class in Munduk Bali

    Location: Munduk, Bali, Indonesia

    Lemongrass, garlic, turmeric.  The Flavors of Bali.  Ginger, cloves, coffee.  The Flavors of Bali. Cardamon, nutmeg, galangal.  The Flavors of Bali. Chili, Chocolate, Fruit.

    The flavors of Bali

    At the morning market

    Bali smells good.  Bali tastes good.  And Bali is a feast for the eyes as well.  A beautiful tropical island in Indonesia with happy and kind people, gorgeous mountains and seashore, lush green foliage and bright tropical flowers and fruits with flavors that explode in your mouth and bring a smile to your face.  The Flavors of Bali. Fresh and unforgettable.

    During our three days at the Puri Lumbung

    The flavors of bali

    Buying the banana leaf

    Cottages in the village of Munduk we enjoyed an hour and a half cooking class where we learned about combining all the amazing flavors of Bali into six distinctly Bali dishes.  We enjoyed a feast after we cooked and found a new appreciation for fresh and local ingredients.

    Our day started with an early morning walk to the tiny and very authentic local market in the village

    The flavors of bali

    Beautiful view from the outdoor kitchen

    of Munduk.  We purchased our fresh ingredients here including; cassava a green similar to spinach that would go in our soup; ferns a green similar to fiddleheads that we would use to make a side dish; lemongrass a Bali staple that we would use in multiple dishes; fresh white corn that we would use in corn fritters; banana leaves we would wrap the fish in; and galanga a root flavoring similar to ginger that we would use in multiple dishes.

    The flavors of bali

    Ingredients waiting the preparations

    When we arrived at the beautiful open air kitchen overlooking the rice fields and vast valley below we found four work stations each with a ulekan and cobek – a Balinese style mortar and pestle made from local basalt.  At each work station ingredients where waiting in each ulekan for us to begin the somewhat arduous process of crushing and combining the flavors of Bali for each individual dish.

    The flavors of bali

    John crushes the spices

    Timbungan Ayam is a clear chicken soup with cassava leaves and fried shallots.  We ground the flavors of chili, shallot, galangal, lemongrass, nutmeg, lime leaves and shrimp paste into a mash that was then combined with chopped fresh chicken and cassava and cooked on the open flame stove top.  It was a delicious broth and one of my favorite flavors of the day.

    The flavors of bali

    Me preparing the soup

    Bergedel Tagung is a fried corn fritter.  In the ulekan we ground the flavors of Bali of nutmeg, chili, garlic and shrimp paste.  We then took the fresh corn off the cobb, mixed it with the spices and an egg and cooked the fritters (about the size of a fifty cent piece) in corn oil.  Crunchy and delicious.

    The flavors of bali

    Carole wraps the fish in banana leaf

    Pepes Ikan Laut is a fish dish smothered in a Balinese paste then wrapped in banana leaf and grilled.  In the ulekan we had our toughest ingredients to grind including shallots, garlic, turmeric, ginger, aromatic ginger, candle nut (like macadamia) nutmeg, tomato, shrimp paste, chile and salt & pepper.  First mixed with coconut oil into a paste, this mixture was smeared all over chunks of fresh fish.  The banana leaves were laid out in two layers with one large bay leaf in the center.  The fish was

    The flavors of Bali

    Fish on the grill

    spooned evenly on four banana leaves which were wrapped and folded and secured with a bamboo toothpick before being laid in a hot pan on an open flame for grilling.  When it was time to eat we opened the banana leaf envelope to find the chunks had fused together into an aromatic and juicy fish surprise.

    Be Siap Sere Bawang is a chicken dish with a strong lemongrass flavor.  We began by grinding the spices of shrimp paste, chili, turmeric, salt & pepper into a paste.  The cooked chicken was

    The flavors of bali

    Everybody crushing spices

    shredded into pieces and mixed with the spices, sliced lemongrass and sliced shallots then quickly sauted to soften the lemongrass.  Probably my least favorite of all the dishes just because of the too strong flavor of lemongrass.

    Urap Campur is like a side vegetable dish.  It can be made with most any green vegetable such as cassava, cabbage or long bean.  For our cooking class we used local ferns.  The ferns were

    The flavors of bali

    Top Ferns and fish in banana leaf  Bottom lemongrass chicken & cornfritters

     

    blanched and water squeezed out before we arrived.  The ferns were mixed together with grated coconut, cooked local red beans, fried shallot, juice of the kaffir lime and salt and pepper.

    Bubur Campur was our dessert a mix of local fruits including jackfruit, banana, pandan, mangosteen and sweet potato.  We boiled the fruit in water with palm sugar syrup for sweetener, a bit of starch for thickening and coconut milk for flavor.  It was served in a bowl and we all agreed it would have been better served over vanilla ice cream.

    The flavors of bali

    Successful team

    We have really enjoyed our time in Bali and getting to know the Flavors of Bali.  As in so many cultures the Balinese enjoy what is local and seasonal in their simple but delicious everyday foods.  And we enjoyed experiencing it first hand.  The Flavors of Bali.  Fabulous.

    Check out our other posts about our time in the beautiful island of Bali.

    This post includes affiliate links and we may be compensated if you purchase these books.  Any money earned here goes back to the maintenance costs of this .  Thank you.

     

    Fab Asia Travel

    Top Six Delicious Things to Eat for Breakfast in Sri Lanka

    Location: Sri Lanka

    Step away from the bacon and eggs.  Give a rest to the omelette and toast.  Wondering what to eat for breakfast in Sri Lanka? When in Sri Lanka eat like the locals do with these six delicious Sri Lankan breakfast specialities.

    1. Hoppers – I could eat these all day, and actually you can eat them for more than breakfast.  There are two kinds of hoppers (see below for the second), but my favorite is the “crepe” like hopper.  Made with a batter in a bowl shaped griddle, the hopper holds the bowl shape to cradle a fried egg inside.

      Hopper with egg on the right and curry and dhal on the left

      Absolutely delicious and a perfect little boat for your egg. These hoppers can also be served at breakfast (or later in the day) filled with curry and dhal. So good.

    2. String Hoppers – made from thin noodles and formed into little nests, the string hopper is delicious with yellow lentil dhal, so healthy

      Lots of goodies on this plate including egg hopper, string hopper and Pol Sambol

      and good for you.  Experienced eaters of string hopper can put the dhal inside and eat it almost like a taco. This takes some practice, so I enjoyed my string hopper with dhal on top and eaten with knife and fork.

    3. Pol Roti – You’ll find Roti everywhere and at any meal, but at breakfast it is usually coconut Roti.  Roti is a delicious unleavened flatbread found in many countries including India, Pakistan, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Singapore, Maldives, Bangladesh and Malaysia.  Made

      Pol Roti with butter and katta sambol

      with coarse ground flour, coconut, water and salt and grilled and served warm.  We have eaten it spread with butter as well as spread with Katta Sambol.  I’m in love with Katta Sambol.  Usually I don’t like spicy but this delicious chili paste is perfect with Roti and

      Katta Sambol

      other dishes and has just the right amount of heat.

    4. Pol Sambol – another spicy concoction served at many meals but we have enjoyed it often at breakfast.  Used as a condiment (like Katta

      Coconut used for Pol Roti

      Sambol), Pol Sambol is  grated coconut, lots of garlic, lots of chili powder, red onion and lime juice.  Wow.

    5. Milk Rice – the first time I ordered this I was expecting something like a porridge.  But no.  Milk rice arrives in a small block or triangle and is sticky and dense like sushi rice.  Milk Rice, also called Kiribath, tastes similar to a rice pudding.  We have eaten it sweetened

      Milk Rice and Katta Sambol

      with coconut milk or savory with onion mixed in served with Katta Sambal.

    6. Toast Sandwich – this is the closest thing to a western breakfast.  A cooked egg placed inside white bread, spread with an onion garlic mixture then cooked on a sandwich press.  It’s a cross between french toast and omelette.  Good and easy finger food.

    There you have it.  Enjoy the local cuisine when you travel.  You discover so much about a place through its food.  Sri Lanka is delicious.

     

    Fab Africa Travel  --  Fab Food

    The Rainbow Nation

    Colorful South Africa and it’s Colorful Cuisine

    Location: South Africa

    They call it the Rainbow Nation.  A country with an extraordinary political and social background, with a kaleidoscope of ethnic Peoples, blended into one nation.  Shaken not stirred.

    But here it is – amazing South Africa.  Hundreds and hundreds of years of slavery and oppression, colonization and apartheid but surprisingly today

    Nelson Mandela

    together.  A mere 25 years after the end of apartheid (meaning apartness in Afrikaans) people of all backgrounds seem to get along here, quit happily.

    But despite equal rights it’s clear to see the economic difference still between white South Africans, “non- whites” and colored. These terms are from the apartheid era, when every person fit into one of these three categories and laws kept groups separate in all aspects of life.  Today you’ll still find people living separately in historically separate neighborhoods such as the

    Colorful Bo Kaap

    Muslim Bo Kaap and the Black Townships, but progress is slowly changing this.

    There are nine South African native tribes who lived as hunter gatherers and pastoral people for thousands of years before the Dutch East India Company arrived 1652. As the Dutch entrenched (and later the British) they used indigenous people as slaves and began bringing in slaves from Angola, Mozambique, Madagascar, Malaysia, Indonesia and India as well as others.

    Today’s South Africa is made up of the ancestors of all of these races, a colorful mix of cultures truly

    Cooking on the Braai

    making it The Rainbow Nation.

    The gastronomic effects of such a blended nation cannot be overstated, and luckily for visitors the reward is superb.  Taking the foods of these groups and combining it with the wide variety of fresh produce, local seafood and game you get a melded and delicious South African cuisine.

    Pumpkin Pap curried cabbage

    I am no expert, but I sure like to eat, and during my time so far in South Africa I have joyfully discovered wonderful foods and flavors and also took a fun cooking class to delve even deeper.

    Let me share with you some of my favorite discoveries;

    Pap – for breakfast or anytime, pap is a staple food with a long history.  It is very much like fufou that we ate in Burkina Faso (made from plantain) and when made from maize (the most frequently used grain) it tastes much like grits or polenta. We have enjoyed pap several times and my favorite by far was the Pumpkin Pap we made together at our

    Smoked Snoek

    cooking class with Nadege Cuisine.  It was served with a curried cabbage and delicious smoked Snoek.

    Snoek – is a very popular (and very ugly) locally caught white fish that can grow very large.  It is of the mackerel family and is known as barracuda in other parts of the world.  One of the favorite ways to enjoy this fish is grilled on the Braai (see below) or smoked.  Smoked Snoek is available in grocery stores.  It tasted very much like smoked sturgeon to me.  The smokey and salty mixed with the sweet pumpkin pap was a real winner.

    Seasoning for the Braai

    Braai – the local word for BBQ is as much a social function as a food.  Most anything can be thrown on the Braai, but most meats and fish are slathered with a spicy rub mix of chili, salt and herbs.  Braais happen frequently where neighbors and friends gather to enjoy each other’s company around the Braai.  The host provides the salad and the guests bring their own meat and drink.  It’s very popular to cook Snoek on the Braai slathered in apricot jam.

    Bobotie – my favorite of all the foods I have tried so

    Bobotie

    far, this is the unofficial national dish of South Africa.  The dish likely has its roots in Indonesia and it is a savory mix of ground spiced meat with a custard topping and usually served or combined with rice.  We had this at a famous Bo Kaap restaurant called Biesmiellah and it was fantastic.  Always served with chutney.

    Chutney – Nearly every meal in South Africa is served with chutney, a sweet preserve usually of fruits but it also can include onions or savory produce.  Mango chutney is very popular and usually served with the Bobotie.

    Breyani

    Breyani – we also tried this dish at Biesmiellah and it was great.  The masala spice noted the heritage of this dish as Indian or Malaysian.  It can be made with different meats, we enjoyed it with chicken.  The dish is a fragrant mix of cumin, corrrinder, cinnamon, cardamom,lentils, rice and sometimes hard-boiled eggs and is served with a yogurt sauce on the side.

    Crayfish – I ordered this item at a nice restaurant we

    Crayfish

    went to in Cape Town called Aubergine and it was fantastic.  It’s nothing at all like what I think of as the small crayfish we sometimes eat at home.  It actually is a small lobster.  Lucky for me this appetizer dish was perfectly cooked and served with a luscious squid ink pasta.  Perfection.

    Ostrich – a very popular red meat all over the

    Nadege pan frys the ostrich

    southern parts of Africa you will find ostrich on menus and in grocery stores everywhere.  It is a very dark red meat, best prepared and served simply, and we enjoyed it flash pan-fried and medium rare at our cooking class with Nadege. Ostrich is farmed in South Africa and all parts of the animal are used including the skin for leather, the feathers for down, the beak and bones for jewelry and the egg shells for jewelry and decorative items.  It’s not as easy though to find a fresh ostrich egg.  Each egg is the equivalent of 24 chicken eggs.  I still hope to buy and cook one soon.

    Mealie Bread – I love this delicious bread, similar to cornbread we make at home but lighter.  My favorite preparation I’ve had so far was at Aubergine where they added a hint of caraway.  Delicious.

    Cape Malay Curry – Sweeter than other curries I’ve had, Cape Malay curry once again uses the favorite apricot of South Africa as well as cinnamon and ginger and makes a delicious not to be missed meal.

    Game – much of the game meat is farmed and

    Malva Pudding

    available and shows up on restaurant menus including Warthog, Impala and Springbok, which is small deer-like animal we saw a lot of in Namibia.  We enjoyed the Springbok at Aubergine where it was perfectly cooked medium rare and served with a nice black mushroom sauce with a hint of walnut.

    Malva Pudding – using the word pudding in the British way for cake, Malva pudding is one of several popular dessert and sweet dishes uniquely South African.  This dark spongy cake made from butter, vanilla and apricot jam (there it is again) tastes much like a bread pudding and is usually

    Potatoe pudding with peach compote

    served with a warm custard or ice cream.

    Potato Pudding – similarly this lovely cake, also much like custard or bread pudding, is made from potatoes, coconut oil, cardamom, almond extract and condensed milk and is served with a stewed fruit sauce of dried peaches and cinnamon.  A perfect end to the meal we had at Nadege Cuisine.

    Through out the Cape Town region you will also find many offerings that reflect the British, French and Dutch population as well as other African nations.  We enjoyed a fabulous Ethiopian meal one afternoon for lunch at Madam Taitou’s and a

    Eggs Benedict

    beautiful Eggs Benedict the next day for breakfast at the historic and gorgeous British colonial hotel Mount Nelson.  However, you won’t find a restaurant calling itself a “South African” restaurant.  The cuisine is just really coming into its own as a stand alone fare, and rightfully so.  Hopefully soon, South African will be as common as Mexican or Italian.

    It certainly is just as delicious.