Fab Oceania Travel

    The Great Barrier Reef Australia

    Just Keep Swimming

    Location: The Great Barrier Reef Australia

    “Hey, Mr. Grumpy Gills… When life gets you down, you know what you gotta do? Just keep swimming.” – Dory the Fish from Disney’s Finding Nemo

    The Great Barriee Reef


    Finding Nemo is one of my favorite Disney/Pixar movies, and this past week I have had endless Finding Nemo moments and quotes running through my head.  Being

    in Australia and finally snorkeling the Great Barrier Reef, my thoughts have wandered to the

    The Great Barriee Reef

    Reef and fish

    adventures of that movie and I have smiled to myself underwater and thought “Just keep swimming.”

    Although going out on a snorkel trip on The Great Barrier Reef took us way over our Grand Adventure daily budget (actually everything in Australia is

    The Great Barrier Reef

    Birdseye view

    taking us over budget), we could not come here to beautiful Cairns and not see the reef.  It’s another one of those “I don’t have a bucket list” bucket list items.  I love snorkeling and I wanted to have that once in a lifetime opportunity.

    The weather on the day we went wasn’t great – grey and overcast and we even saw some rain.  I am in constant worry about my motion sickness

    The Great Barriee Reef


    problem, so I stood outside and watched the horizon the entire hour and half boat trip out to the reef, even when the rain started to come down.  Hey I was gonna get wet anyway right?  Luckily, thanks to massive amounts of drugs, my sea sickness problem did not materialize while on the boat.  That was a good sign!

    “You got a problem, buddy? Huh? Huh? Do ya, do ya, do ya?” Dory

    We booked our reef tour with Reef Magic out of

    The Great Barrier Reef

    Marine World of Reef Magic

    Cairns which took us to the outer reef and a pontoon platform stationed there called Marine World.  We disembarked the boat to the pontoon and here we were outfitted with our snorkels, fins, masks and Lycra “stinger” suits to protect us from

    Great Barriee Reef



    “I shall call him Squishy and he shall be mine and he shall be my Squishy.” Dory

    Reef Magic offers many options from the pontoon, all at an additional charge including snorkel safari, snuba, scuba, glass bottom boat, semi-submersible boat and helicopter rides.  But since

    Great Barriee Reef

    That’s us!

    we had already exceeded our budget (for two of us we paid $426 Australian about $330 US), we were just interested in snorkeling.  We were dressed and ready to go pretty quickly and one of the first people in the water.

    Great Barrier Reef

    Us with Wally

    We immediately encountered “Wally”, one of the biggest fish on the reef.  Luckily Reef Magic’s professional photographer was on hand as we entered the water and she got some amazing shots of us with Wally.  All the photos in this blog are from Reef Magic’s professional photographer.  Since we don’t have an underwater camera we have never gotten underwater photos on any of our snorkel trips on the Grand Adventure.  So, despite the fact my husband almost wet his pants when I told him the price, we bit the bullet and bought the photos for an additional $75 (about

    Great Barrier Reef

    Hey Wally

    $60 US).

    “Ahh you guys made me ink.” Pearl

    Wally is a resident fish of this part of the reef.  He is an amazing species called Maori Wrasse.  This fish is a female for the first eight years of its life.  And then poof.  It’s a male.  I know – what the heck?  Isn’t that nuts?  Some times I think Mother Nature is menopausal!

    Great Barrier Reef


    After our encounter with Wally we began to explore the reef.  Marine World has a cordoned off section of the reef for its guests to enjoy.  Within this area there was a huge variety of corals; big, small, blue, green, orange, white.  Some are soft and rounded, others spikey and dangerous looking.  In all the

    Great Barriee Reef


    snorkeling I have done, I had never seen coral that waved in the current like it did here.  It’s a beautiful thing to watch.  Most of the coral we see in our lives is dead.  And while its pretty even when it is dead and dry, the beauty of live coral is spectacular.  Yes this is an incredible living

    Great Barriee Reef


    creature and we surely must protect it.

    “Righteous! Righteous! ” Crush

    So I loved the corals and kept going back for more of that but of course there were the fish. Many, many fish.  I don’t know all their names, but they really are beautiful to watch.  Some of the fish are very solitary, just going along and doing their

    Great Barrier Reef


    business, feeding and swimming and doing what fish do.  Other fish keep in groups, large schools that move together almost as one, weaving above and around the coral mountains.  There are some fish that are so tiny you don’t even see them until you are swimming right through them, while others

    Great Barrier Reef

    Giant Clam

    are so big that they freak you out a bit.  Many fish are shy and you need to look inside the coral to find them.  There are also beautiful giant clams, sea slugs, squid, eels and rays.  And no we did not see any sharks.

    Great Barrier Reef


    From this moment on, you shall now be known as Sharkbait.” Gill

    We swam to the outer edge of the roped off area and we were alone in this section just as a beautiful turtle swam by on the surface.  We

    Great Barrier Reef


    almost missed him because we were looking down and he was swimming right next to us on the surface.  But then he dived and we watched him swim to the bottom looking for a snack.  I believe this was a loggerhead turtle.  We had seen this kind in Sri Lanka. Beautiful brown bodies and not too large.  We watched him swim away beyond the area we were confined to and into the great wide ocean.

    “Saw the whole thing, dude. First you were all like “whoa”, and we were like “whoa”, and you were like “whoa…” Crush

    After about an hour we went back to the pontoon to have a rest.  Reef Magic served a buffet lunch

    Great Barrier Reef


    that included salads and fruit, bread, chicken, sushi, lasagna, curry and roast beef.  But I only ate a little cause I continued to worry about my motion sickness.  Arne ate my share.  It all looked good.  Great Barrier ReefCoffee, tea and water was also available and a bar on the boat was open when we weren’t underway.  Clearly they have had motion sensitive passengers before and they were well stocked with ginger beer (like ginger ale, non-alcoholic). My beverage of choice.

    “I am a nice shark, not a mindless eating machine.” Bruce the Great White Shark

    The Great Barriee Reef

    Fish in all sizes

    We headed back out to snorkel more after lunch.  The water seemed a bit calmer but it was also more cloudy so not as easy to see – but that was okay.  We tried to swim to all the areas and to the far-reaching parts of the swimming area.  We noticed most snorkelers stayed very close to the boat.  Understandably if you are an inexperienced snorkeler or not comfortable in the water.  Reef Magic had life jackets as well as float noodles and other devices for anyone looking for a little more reassurance.

    Great Barrier Reef

    Some are shy

    We snorkeled for about 30 minutes and then decided to call it a day.  We went back on the pontoon and stretched out on a lounge chair for the next hour and a half.  Surprisingly, despite the overcast sky, it was warm and we both got a bit of a sunburn.

    Great Barrier Reef

    My Fab Fifties Life!

    Finally it was time to turn in our gear and make our way off the pontoon and back to the vessel for the hour and half ride back.  Once again I stood and watched the horizon the entire way, including during a deluge about half way home.

    But I did it.  I did not get sick.  I snorkeled the Great Barrier Reef.  I can check that off the “I don’t have a bucket list”

    Great Barrier Reef


    bucket list.  And remembered to just keep swimming.

    “Just keep swimming. Just keep swimming. Just keep swimming, swimming, swimming. What do we do? We swim, swim.” Dory

    Thanks goes to the wonderful photography of Reef Magic!

    Read more of our Australia adventure here



    This post includes affiliate links and I may receive a commission if you buy any of these products.  Any money earned goes to help support the cost of the blog.


    Fabulous Reading Wednesday

    Book Review – Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine: A Novel by Gail Honeyman

    Reading Wednesday

    Location: Book Review

    This blog contains Affiliate Links and I may receive a commission if you purchase this book

    Book Review – Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine: A Novel by Gail Honeyman

    As I read this book I kept thinking “this will definitely be a movie”.  So as I started to write this review I googled it, and sure enough it will.  One of Reese Wetherspoons upcoming movies with her new production company.  And in fact she may even play the title character.

    Whaky and quirky and lacking most social skills, Eleanor Oliphant leads an overly structured life with no friends, no family and very little interaction with anyone.  Except her co-workers at her office where she has worked for nine years.  But her co-workers find her really strange, and Eleanor has no idea why.

    Except for the large burn scar on her face – Eleanor thinks she’s normal.  Well, maybe except for the three bottles of vodka she drinks on the weekend, Eleanor thinks she’s normal.  Maybe the fact that she wears only black pants and white blouse everyday, or she eats the exact same thing everyday – or she speaks to her mother every Wednesday night even though she doesn’t know where her mother is.  Eleanor realizes that probably isn’t normal.  Eleanor’s obsession with a local rock star seems normal to her – in fact she is so sure the rocker will fall in love with her, if they could only meet.  Not normal.

    Eleanor’s life changes the day she coincidentally meets the new I.T. guy at her office and coincidentally is walking out of the building at the same time as he is and they coincidentally see an old man have a heart attack on the sidewalk right in front of them.

    And so begins Eleanor’s life lessons in learning to have a conversation, break from her routine, speak the truth about her past, her sister, her mother and all that took place in her abused and horrible childhood.  Eleanor’s introduction to reality begins right there.

    Sometimes laugh out loud, sometimes get your tissue, Eleanor’s story and those who rescue her is endearing and emotional, hysterical and sobering.  Watch for this one on the big screen.

    Five stars for Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine.

    Check out last week’s review of “The Snow Child”


    Fab Oceania Travel

    Uluru Sacred Legends

    Kuniya and Liru

    Location: Uluru Rock, Australia

    There are many Uluru Sacred Legends, embraced and told by the local Anangu people.  The aboriginal Anangu are said to be possibly the oldest native people in the world, dating back more than 50,000 years.  The Uluru Sacred Legend is just one of many beautiful stories of this beautiful culture and their land.


    The sunrises behind Uluru

    Kuniya and Liru

    Minyma Kuniya the python woman came from the east near Erldunda.  A bad feeling grew in her stomach – something was wrong.  She had to go to Uluru.


    Uluru as seen from the base walk

    Kuniya created inma (ceremony) to connect her eggs together.  She carried them to Uluru in a ring around her neck and placed them at Kuniya Piti.

    Meanwhile, Kuniya’s nephew arrived on the other side of Uluru.  He was being chased by a war party of Liru (poisonous snake) men from out near Kata Tjuta.

    He had broken the law in their land and they were sent to punish him.

    The Liru men threw spears at Kuniya’s nephew.


    Uluru as seen from the base walk.

    One pierced his thigh and many others hit the side of Uluru.

    One Liru warrior, Wati Liru, was left to care for the injured python man.  But he did not do his duty and left the injured man on his own.


    Uluru cave

    Minyma Kuniya realized that her nephew had been injured and was not being cared for properly.

    She raced to Mutijulu Waterhole and saw Wati Liru high up on the cliff.  She called out to him about her nephew, but he only laughed.

    Minyma Kuniya placed her wana (digging stick) upright in the ground in front of her.  Kneeling down, she picked up handfuls of sand and threw it over her body, singing and making herself stronger.


    The morning sun puts a pink glow on Uluru

    She was creating inma (ceremony) to help her confront Wati Liru.Kuniya moved toward Liru singing and dancing akuta – a dance step used by women ready to fight.


    Shadow play

    Kuniya hit him once over the head with her wana.  He fell down but got back up.  She hit him a second time and killed him.

    Kuniya then went and found her injured nephew.  She picked him up, dusted him off, and carried him to Mutijulu Waterhole.

    She created inma and combined their two spirits into one.  They became Wanampi, the rainbow serpent, who lives in and protects the waterhole today.

    This story teaches a traditional form of payback


    Admiring the 1000 foot cliffs

    punishment – a spear to the thigh.  The punisher must then look after the injured person until they are well enough to care for themselves.

    It also teaches about women’s intuition and that a woman may use force to protect her children.

    This is a powerful story, Kuniya is a powerful women.

    Story credit the Anangu People of Uluru and Uluru National Park and Parks Australia.

    Fabulous Reading Wednesday

    Book Review – The Snow Child: A Novel by Eowyn Ivey

    Reading Wednesday

    Location: Book Review

    Book Review The Snow Child: A Novel by Eowyn Ivey ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

    (This post contains Affiliate Links and I may receive a commission from book sales)

    This is one of those books that got added to my To Read list because it showed up on a blog I read on Pinterest.  I was attracted to it purely by the title – and without knowing a thing about it I added to my list.

    And I loved it.  Sweet, sentimental, a bit whimsical and yet believable I couldn’t put it down.

    Ivey takes us to 1920 Alaska where Jack and Mable eke out an existence trying to farm the desolate and barren Alaska land where they have come from “back east” to homestead.

    Not your typical homesteaders, this married couple in their fifties is childless and searching for something they don’t even know what.  Mable feels a failure for not being able to have children and she is lonely and wants nothing more than to live a life of solitude.  Jack struggles to farm all on his own, with no sons to help and no money to hire help.

    One night the couple has a moment of happiness and joy, and in an unusual move they build a snow child in front of their cabin, complete with dress, hat and mittens.  They laugh and enjoy the infrequent happy moment.

    The next day the snow child is gone, but they begin to spot a small blonde child running and hiding in the woods.  Here is where the miracle of this story begins.  Part miracle, part providence, who knows how or why this couple, this little girl and eventually their neighbors come together to make a family.

    The ending both sweet and sad, brings together the powerful ties that bind life in a remote wilderness and how family is what you make it, if you can.

    Five stars for The Snow Child ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️


    Fab Oceania Travel

    Exmouth Western Australia

    Ten Reasons I Fell For It

    Location: Exmouth Western Australia

    Australia is huge.  So. Darn. Huge.  Unfortunately, we get a skewed image of our world, by the skewed world maps we use.  But the reality is, Australia is the same size as the lower 48 of the USA.  Even here in little ole Exmouth Western

    Exmouth Western Australia

    Same size

    Australia it’s easy to feel how vast this country is.  Wide open.

    Australia has a population of 25 million living in a country the same size as the USA.  The USA has a population of 325 million.  So it’s easy to understand how big and empty it feels.

    They call Western Australia WA and if you compare it to the state of Washington – also called WA – you will get a good feel for how big this place is.

    Exmouth Western Australia

    Little WA and big WA

    You could put at least a dozen Washington WAs into Western Australia WA.

    Sometimes we meet people who tell us they have traveled to the USA.  We ask where they have been and they say- New York, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, San Fransisco.  Sometimes it is also Grand Canyon and Orlando.  Although I love all of these places, I always feel these people have not seen the real USA – that big open prairie, the purple mountains majesty, the crashing Pacific and the Great Lakes.

    Here in Exmouth Western Australia I realize I find

    Exmouth Western Australia

    Sunset Exmouth

    myself guilty of the same.  We will be heading to Ayers Rock next, then the Great Barrier Reef and on to Sydney.  Seeing all the top sites but

    Exmouth Western Australia

    Beautiful water

    are we seeing the real Australia?

    So this is one of the reasons I am so thankful Arne said we needed to come here, and specifically to come to Western Australia where few tourists go.  I love this town and this coast and I want to encourage others to love it too.  So, here are the ten reasons I have fallen in love with Exmouth Western

    Exmouth Western Australia

    Sandy beaches


    1.  The Coast – the West coast of Western Australia is diverse, even here in this tiny part we have enjoyed.  The amazing Ningaloo Reef is beautiful and the water is turquoise and the sand is white. It’s pretty close to perfect.  From the town of Exmouth Western Australia you’re at the beach in
      Exmouth Western Australia

      Amazing sea life


    2. The Marine Park – all along the coast here the marine park draws those who love the ocean.  So much to love here as a diver or snorkeler or fisherman.  Some of the world’s most amazing creatures call this coast home at
      Exmouth Western Australia

      Ant hill

      some time during the year, including the largest fish in the world, the Whale Shark, the Humbpack Whale, Orca Whale, Manta Rays and many other kinds of rays, sharks of every kind and so many, many fish.

    3. Turtles – in addition to all the above mentioned sealife the Coast Range National Park is home to one of the largest turtle
      Exmouth Western Australia


      nesting sites in the world.  You can swim with the turtles by day, and at sunset or sunrise and sometimes other times you can watch the female turtles nest.  They haul themselves out of the water and up to a safe spot in the dunes where they dig a nest and lay their eggs.  They then go back to the ocean and leave their progeny to fend for themselves.  Approximately 50 days later the eggs hatch en masse.  If you are lucky you can witness the little babes scurry to the ocean, drawn by an inner compass telling them where to go.  Incredible.

    4. Wildlife – it’s more than just remarkable sea life around Exmouth Western Australia.  Don’t be surprised if you see an Emu walking down the sidewalk or through the little village.
      Exmouth Western Australia


      Kangaroos?  Definitely.  There are three kinds of kangaroos in the area, the smaller Euro, the larger red and the grey.  We’ve seen them all.  We also saw two dingos – similar to

      Exmouth Western Australia


      coyotes, they are nocturnal and hard to spot.  We have seen a lot of lizards, including the Perentie, and a plethora of birds big and small.

    5. Hiking – the Coast Range National Park runs
      Exmouth Western Australia


      for about 70km along the coast and provides several opportunities to get out of your car and see the rocky range and canyons dotted through the park.  The favorite is the Yardie Creek at the end of the road.  Surprising to see this

      Exmouth Western Australia

      Yardie Creek

      beautiful creek coming out of the dry and arid mountains.  We also enjoyed visit the Charles Knife and Shothole Canyons for spectacular views as far as the eye can see.  Caution is important in these wild, hot and

      Exmouth Western Australia

      Shothole Canyon

      dry areas and you must carry plenty of water.  A fly net for your face is also extremely important, as the flies are a real nuisance otherwise.

    6. The Village of Exmouth – tiny Exmouth Western Australia is home to about 2000 people.  We visited in the late summer, after the kids had gone back to school.  Few tourists are here at this time of year, although during the Australian summer months
      Exmouth Western Australia

      Using our fly nets

      (November – February) the population swells with many Australians and other visitors from around the world.  We liked how quiet it was.  Exmouth Western Australia has a nice grocery store, a handful of restaurants, a pharmacy, a hair and nail salon and a few

      Exmouth Western Australia

      New Ningaloo Center

      other shops.  The town also has a very nice brand new “center” that includes a visitor information center, senior center, library, and meeting rooms.

    7. Craft Beer – for a small town we were very happy to find not one, but TWO craft
      Exmouth Western Australia

      Froth Craft

      breweries.  Froth Craft and Whalebone both had excellent locally made brews and food.  We spent one Saturday evening at Whalebone listening to the band our Airbnb host is in.  So fun!  Our server at Whalebone

      Exmouth Western Australia


      that night was the same woman who was our server for lunch at the local Vegan Social Society a few days before.  It’s a very small town.

    8. Speaking of Airbnb – The one we stayed in here in Exmouth Western Australia is number 39 and it has shot to the top of our list, one
      Exmouth Western Australia

      Social Society

      of our favorite Airbnb’s so far.  A guest house next to the hosts home, we felt so comfortable here in our space and really enjoyed the lovely family.  This family is very entrenched in their community with their two darling daughters and the husband’s local

      Exmouth Western Australia

      We loved our Airbnb

      construction business.  We were very impressed when he went off as a volunteer firefighter to try to put out a big wildfire we had watched out in the distance for several days.

    9. The weather – it is a wee bit hotter than I would like, but “it’s a dry heat”!  We are out in it everyday and we have adjusted.  I’m thrilled  to get away from the humidity for a while and so is my hair!  In  fact, I have realized that
      Exmouth Western Australia

      Sunrise run in our neighborhood

      some of my aches and pains I endure are likely due to high humidity.  Here I have felt great, very little pain in my normal hip and sciatic area and I have been running again everyday!  Feels so good to be back at it, especially with the handy, flat trail right next to our airbnb.

    10. English – it’s really nice to find ourselves back in an English-speaking country.  We get a
      Exmouth Western Australia

      Farewell Exmouth!

      kick out of trying to communicate as we go around the world, but it also is tiring and sometimes problematic.  So here we are speaking English, a somewhat different, but easy to grasp version, and we are very happy.

    So, there you go.  Ten reasons I fell for Exmouth Western Australia.  I even looked at real estate listings.  It’s a sweet town – you should come and see!


    Fab Asia Travel

    Visit South Korea – Spend a Weekend with the Monks

    Location: South Korea

    Visit South Korea for some amazing experiences, delicious foods, spectacular scenery and to spend a weekend with the Monks. You won’t regret it.

    South Korea a weekend with the monks

    Our group together

    I’ve done a lot of cool things in my life.  A few experiences stand out to me.  As I have aged I am more aware how unique some of these moments have been; taking a shower on the Serengeti with water heated over an open fire, eating honey and coffee with the leaders of a village in Ethiopia, sitting cross legged on the floor in the traditional home of an ancient Japanese master paper umbrella artist while he gave my family a personal demonstration of his craft. Swimming with sea lions in Galapagos, dolphins in Zanzibar and Manta Rays in Hawaii.   Participating in the annual bird inventory on Molokai and summiting Warma Wanusqa Peak (13,500 feet) on the Inca Trail in Peru. I’ve danced with the natives in a Burkina Faso village, and discussed motherhood with the Himba women in Namibia.  Remarkable experiences all.

    South Korea a weekend with the monks

    Enjoying our vegetarian meal

    I never really set out to accomplish anything specifically unique.  I only have found myself in situations that seem unique to others.  And these moments are the ones that have defined me and have broadened my awareness of the world.  These moments I hold dear, each difficult to describe or put into words and accurately share.  They are the definition of indescribable.

    South Korea a weekend with the monks

    Learning about the prostrations

    In Korea I had an indescribable experience lucky enough to spend a weekend with the Monks in the Geumsunsa Temple in the mountains outside of Seoul.  Adding this to my list of unique and memorable life experiences.  I really recommend both a visit to South Korea and a weekend with the monks.

    I went into this with next to no knowledge of Buddhism.  I still know very little, but I did gain awareness of a way of life that is not a religion, but a goal to practice living life with an open heart. According to Buddhist traditions a Buddha is a fully awakened being who has completely purified his mind of the three poisons of desire, aversion and ignorance.

    The Geumsunsa Temple is perched on Mount Bukhan to the North and West of Seoul.  We arrived late, our GPS refusing to cooperate and maneuvering through the streets of Seoul without it proved a difficult task.  Once we found the parking lot at the base of the mountain we hiked the last quarter mile straight up the mountain to the temple entrance – the only access to the temple is on foot.

    South Korea a weekend with the monks

    Arne at the silent breakfast

    Arriving late I was frazzled and frantic, and certainly not in a transcendental state of mind, but I took a few deep breaths and prepared myself to spend a weekend with the monks.  We entered in a room with about a dozen other people where the orientation had already begun. We sat quietly in the back trying to catch our breath and catch up on the presentation.  It was presented in both Korean and English.

    We were given a tour of the temple and some history.  The 1000-year-old temple is small compared to some (five monks when some temples have 200) but it is very beautiful and well maintained. I wish I could visit in spring or fall, I’m sure it is spectacular when all the foliage on the mountain is out.

    South Korea a weekend with d with the monks


    We were served a very good vegetarian dinner with soup, rice and multiple kimchee and vegetable choices.  We were instructed that we had to eat everything that we took, down to the last grain of rice.  No food could be wasted.  We were shown how to use an apple slice to clean our plates of all food remnants so they almost appeared to not even need to be washed.

    South Korea a weekend with d with the monks


    Following dinner we were escorted to the Buddha room, a beautiful part of the temple adorned to praise Buddha, the teacher. A Buddhist temple is called Vihara and is a place for education. In the shrine room of each temple is where a large Buddha and statues of his disciples are. Here is where we began our 108 prostrations.  I was worried about accomplishing this task.  Starting in a standing position to lying prone on the floor, methodically and with purpose 108 times in a row.  I was already finding my body was having a great deal of difficulty sitting cross-legged on the floor – an unnatural position for most Americans.  We were instructed how to do the prostrations and how to release our minds from turmoil. The practice of Buddhism is the never-ending humbling of the ego. Humbling yourself before the world, by lowering your body you realize that you are one with everything. Performing 108 prostrations is yet another path towards the realization of the True Self.

    And so we began.  108 times; each prostration symbolizing a goal, or gratitude or repentance; For example; I prostrate myself to show appreciation to my parents for giving birth to me.  Or I prostrate myself to ask forgiveness for people I may have hurt. Or I prostrate myself for a humble mind. Or I prostrate myself for peace among all countries and an end to all wars.

    And on and on, 108 times.  It lasted about 30 minutes and I was sweating and exhausted when it was over.

    South Korea a weekend with the monks

    The beautiful temple

    We were later asked to choose one of the prostration sentences that spoke to us specifically and we drew pictures then shared with the group.  Many people in the room were brought to tears during this circle time; some feeling stress in their jobs or sadness in lost relationship, and others wanting to show love to their parents who are ailing.  It was an emotional experience for many.  I chose the one that asks to be more humble.  This is truly a goal I have been working on for some time, so it called to me.

    I thought doing 108 prostrations would be the most difficult thing I did during my visit, but no.  Sleeping on the floor was.  Or trying to sleep I should say.  We slept side by side (men and women separated) on an extremely hard floor with a blanket and pillow.  It was a very, very long night.

    South Korea a weekend with the monks

    Arne being flipped during the exercise program

    South Korea a weekend with the monks

    Tea with one of our host monks

    The bell chimed at 4:30am for wake up.  I wasn’t sad to get up.  I really couldn’t lie there anymore.  Our morning was spent in silence and meditation followed by wake up exercises harder than my yoga classes and then a vegetarian ceremonial breakfast, very ritualistic and eaten in silence.  We all then shared in chores around the temple before sitting down to have tea and a conversation with one of the monks. I think this was my favorite time.

    South Korea a weekend with the monks

    We really enjoyed our friendly monks

    The monk prepared and poured the tea for us as she answered each and every question we had about her life as a monk, Buddha and Buddhism, philosophy, the temple and much more.  It was fascinating and enlightening to see a human being choose to live this life and walk away from everything materialistic and dedicate everything to the practice of becoming Buddha.

    South Korea a weekend with the monks

    On top of the sunny mountain

    Finally we headed up the mountain for a beautiful hike on the cold and sunny morning.  We spent time sitting at the top of the mountain enjoying the spectacular scenery and each other’s company and meditating on our time together.  We hiked back to the temple for our vegetarian lunch, paper lantern making and then farewell to our new friends and Temple Geumsunsa.

    South Korea a weekend with the monks

    Farewell to our new friends

    My back and hips were killing me and I was desperate for a nap and a large coffee as we hiked down the path to the car, but my heart and mind were full as I thoughtfully considered what I learned from this experience.  I felt validated in my Fabulous Fifties objectives to not look outside for approval and rather to find it within.  My knowledge that being true to myself, despite what others believe and grateful for all things in my life, good and bad, is the best destiny.  Being honest, forgiving, following my intuition and celebrating the one short life we have is my practice.

    I prostrate myself for a humble mind. Fabulous.

    Note – find out how you can have this experience at


    Fabulous Reading Wednesday

    Reading Wednesday Book Review

    Counting by 7s by Holly Goldberg Sloan

    Location: Book Review

    Book Review – Counting by 7s by Holly Goldberg Sloan

    If you had a child who was a little different…or maybe you were a little different as a child, you will love the story of strange (as in genius) Willow Chance.

    Willow’s life is anything but normal, and her brain is anything but normal as well.  Tragedy in her childhood throws her into crazy adventure where she navigates her own strange approach to life, dealing with being a highly capable student in a mediocre school and the loss of both her adopted parents.

    Willow finds herself befriending a most unusual school councilor, an a-typical Vietnamese-American family and a taxi driver – each who play a big role in what happens next to Willow’s story and her goal of finding where she belong and who will be her forever family.

    I found the characters engaging, often endearing and sometimes silly.  I had several laugh out loud moments in this sweet easy read book.  You will go away smiling.

    Five stars for Counting by 7s.