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What to do in Kuala Lumpur

Beautiful and Cosmopolitan Malaysian City

Location: Kuala Lumpur Malaysia

We had six lovely days to leisurely explore the beautiful city of Kuala Lumpur. You could easily see most of this city in three days, but we have the time and enjoy taking our time, which is exactly how we explored KL. If your travels take you near this city, plan some time here. It is worth it. Here are our recommendations on what to do in Kuala Lumpur.

Sultan Abdul Samad and Merdeka Square

Sultan Abdul Samad Colonial Era Building Kuala Lumpur

The Sultan Abdul Samad Building is among Kuala Lumpur’s earliest Moorish-style buildings, it was built in 1897 and named after the reigning sultan of Selangor at the time. Originally used by the British during Colonial times, the building is most beautiful after dark. Across the street the wide green Merdeka Square, also known as Independence Park is a lovely oasis in the middle of the city.

Eco Park and Hanging Bridges

Kuala Lumpur Hanging Bridge Canopy Walk Eco Park

A surprising find right in the middle of the city (and coincidentally right across the street from our hotel). The Kuala Lumpur Eco Park is a hidden jewel. The forested park is home to a number of swinging bridges that take you up into the canopy to view the flora and the skyscrapers beyond.

Petronas Twin Towers

Petronas Twin Towers Kuala Lumpur

These iconic towers were the tallest in the world from 1998 to 2004. They remain the tallest twin towers. The design looks somewhat like a tall tin can, but at night they glow beautifully and can be seen from miles around. We went to go up the towers on a Monday, only to find out they are closed on Mondays. But we have been up many tall towers so we really didn’t mind. Looking at them from below was really enough for us.

Masjid Wilayah Persekutuan Federal Mosque

Masjid Wilayah Persekutuan Federal Mosque Kuala Lumpur

We have visited beautiful mosques all over the world, but our visit to this mosque was the first time we were greeted with such grace and hospitality. This mosque has a design similar to the Blue Mosque in Istanbul. It’s a bit out of town, but we took a Grab (Uber) from the Batu Caves and it only cost a couple of dollars. The Masjid Wilayah Persekutuan Federal Mosque has a visitor program that is so welcoming. They provide women with the appropriate covering before giving a free tour with an English speaking guide. Our guide was named Noor and she was the sweetest person. Since we arrived right before prayers (we didn’t know that) she invited us to sit in and witness the faithful at prayers. It was a wonderful opportunity. She then gave us a lovely tour and insight both into the mosque and her faith. I highly recommend a visit.

Batu Caves

Batu Caves and Hindu God Statue Kuala Lumpur

We have also visited several Hindu Temples in our travels, and are often struck at how different they are from Mosques. Where Islam has no idols, no flashy temples and only worships one god (Allah), Hinduism has many gods, lots of color and idols that the faithful pray to.

The Batu Caves is a Hindu temple and shrine that attracts thousands of worshippers and tourists, especially during the annual Hindu festival, Thaipusam. 

A limestone outcrop located just north of Kuala Lumpur, Batu Caves has three main caves featuring temples and Hindu shrines, including the giant statue of the Hindu God at the entrance to the 272 Rainbow Stairs.

Batu Caves are easily accessible from KL Central Station via train.

Thean Hou Temple

Thuen Hue Temple Kuala Lumpur

Thean Hou Temple is one of the oldest and largest temples in Southeast Asia. Overlooking the city, the six-tiered Buddhist temple is also known as the Temple of the Goddess of Heaven. Built by KL’s Hainanese community in 1894, it is set on a hill and offers wonderful views of the city.

Supposedly a perfect place to watch the sunrise over Kuala Lumpur, we visited in the late morning and really enjoyed this beautiful place.

Little India and Chinatown

Little India Kuala Lumpur

Kuala Lumpur is a melting pot of ethnicities and cultures and taking a bit of time to wander through Little India and Chinatown provides wonderful insight to these thriving cultures in Malaysia. Both neighborhoods are filled with an abundance of places to eat, excellent shopping as well as people watching. KL’s metro provides easy access to both.

Off the Eaten Track Food Tour Malaysia

Food Tour Malaysia Kuala Lumpur

We are so glad we booked with Food Tour Malaysia, because what we got was by far one of the best food tours we have ever been on. Off the Eaten Track was a wonderful tour not just in Kuala Lumpur proper but at several stops in the suburbs outside the city. I can’t recommend them highly enough. Possibly the best thing we did in all of KL.

Roof Top Bars

Heli Lounge and Rooftop Bar Kuala Lumpur

We read a lot of reviews that talked about the rooftop bars in KL, and even though we are rarely out after dark, we did get to two of the three we wanted to see. The Deep Blue rooftop bar and the Heli Lounge Bar we absolutely recommend for the stunning view. The Heli Lounge is a helicopter pad by day, outdoor bar by night. Crazy. We didn’t get to the rooftop bar at the W Hotel but we sure heard great things about it too.

Subway and Monorail and Grab

Kuala Lumpur Metro

We always get to know the local metros in every city we go to – and are amazed how often we talk to travelers who are afraid to use public transit. KL like almost all other major world cities has a clean, efficient and inexpensive Metro/Subway, train to outlying areas and a short monorail to some neighborhoods not served by the metro. Throughout Asia we also use Grab reliably. Grab is the Asian version of Uber, works just the same but its way cheaper!

What we missed

Well we should have gotten to everything given we were in KL for six days, but we did leave behind a few things we wanted to see including Botanical Gardens, the City Mosque, the Jalan Alor Night Market, the Islamic Art Museum and scores of music and live theater options. I guess we will need to come back!

By the way, we stayed at the amazing Renaissance Kuala Lumpur Hotel and we absolutely loved everything about it. $100 a night in the Executive Suites included breakfast, high-tea and evening cocktails with food. Our room was beautiful and we enjoyed the pool, workout facility and spa. And a block from the metro.

Thanks for being a great place to visit Kuala Lumpur! We loved you!

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6 Comments

  • Reply Teja

    Did you know that the Eco Park is a real rainforest? It’s the last remnant of the original forest in the area, and while it’s been tidied up for visitor comfort, the trees are original rainforest trees. 🙂

    October 25, 2019 at 6:29 pm
    • Reply Laureen

      So cool. We loved it there. We talked to some other visitors who knew nothing about it. It really is a little hidden treasure.

      October 26, 2019 at 4:07 am
  • Reply Sinjana Ghosh

    I didn’t know that there’s so much to do and see in KL. Looks like a wonderful place for a short trip.

    October 25, 2019 at 9:37 pm
    • Reply Laureen

      Right? Me too. I was surprised. We had a great time. And it really was inexpensive.

      October 26, 2019 at 4:06 am
  • Reply Ann

    How beautiful! I never ever think big cities are that beautiful, but this one I like 🙂

    Asia have really not been my cup of tea, but I am beginning to change my point of view. Maybe it could be for me 🙂 Have you always liked asia?

    October 26, 2019 at 1:53 am
    • Reply Laureen

      I used to think that too until I really started to travel. I have really enjoyed all of Malaysia, also Vietnam and Thailand and they are all so darn cheap! We are headed to Myanmar (Burma) next and I am excited to see what that is all about!

      October 26, 2019 at 4:06 am

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