Follow:
Topics:
Island Life  --  Oceania Travel

The Flavors of French Polynesia

Island Life on Mo’orea

Location: Mo'orea Tahiti French Polynesia

We are loving our long visit to the gorgeous island of Mo’orea in French Polynesia where we are living for two months. As usual we are eating our way through this tropical culture and enjoying every morsel. It’s an eclectic collection of cultures and ingredients, so today we will attempt to pull together our impressions of The Flavors of French Polynesia, and specifically of Mo’orea.

Poisson Cru is the national dish

History

The people known as Polynesians migrated to the Society Islands as long ago as 500 BC from as far away as Malaysia. These same people, who are known to be exceptional navigators, populated the south Pacific islands from Hawaii to Samoa and also New Zealand.

On these voyages the Polynesians had bananas and coconut, as well as taro, yams, plantain, breadfruit and sugarcane. It is thought they also brought pigs, dogs and chickens. They carried with them what would become the flavors of French Polynesia.

Polynesian Navigators (Wikipedia)

The Portuguese explorer Magellan sailed through this area in 1521 and the Dutch in the early 1700’s. But the first European to land on Tahiti was a British Explorer named Samuel Wallis who arrived in 1767 and claimed the island for Great Britain, despite the fact that there was already a monarchy ruling Tahiti.

Shortly after Louis-Antoine de Bougainville arrived and claimed it for France. Tahiti became a French Protectorate in 1840 and in 1880 a French Colony when King Pomare V of Tahiti accepted annexation.

Today it is known as a collectivity of France, comprising over 100 islands in the South Pacific. It holds more autonomy than most French possessions and has a President and Assembly.

French Influence

Our food exploration on the island of Mo’orea turns up a lot of French influence in the cuisine. Despite the fact less than 9% of the population claims to be French, it is a big influence in the cuisine. In the grocery stores available for purchase are beautiful terrines, foie gras and cheeses as well as bread. Lots of French bread.

Foie Gras (Canva)

There are several French Restaurants on the island. We enjoyed a fabulous meal at the Mo’orea Beach Cafe and hope to visit another French Restaurant on the island in the weeks ahead.

We have visited many nations with a history of French occupation. The cuisine in many of these still reflects the French influence. Everything from Bahn Mi in Vietnam to the Burkina Faso street food of omelet in a baguette.

Chinese Influence

In the 1860’s the French brought Chinese laborers to the Pacific islands to work in the sugar cane fields. With them of course came their cuisine and food influences. Today the population is made up of about 10% ethnic Chinese.

One food we had was a strange but delicious combination of French and Chinese when we were served Chop Suey noodles inside a French Baguette.

Chop Suey Sandwich

Bao Buns, dumplings and many fried Chinese Foods are popular, especially on Sunday mornings which is always family day.

This week is also the start of the Lunar New Year and there are some local celebrations. In honor we did a favorite Chinese dish at our Airbnb with local Tahitian Shrimp and shared it on our YouTube channel. Check it out here Kung Pao Shrimp,

I’ve Got a Lovely Bunch of Coconuts

Coconuts are a staple here on the island and islanders use every part, both historically and today. The amazing coconut has water, milk, meat as well as strong fiber for cloth and rope. Coconut sugar, coconut flour, coconut oil (known as Copra Oil) all are part of the culture. And the shell becomes a cup or a bowl. It’s a multipurpose and delicious food.

Coconut

Beyond coconut the island weather creates a thriving environment for tropical fruits of many kinds. We have talked in past blog posts about the abundance of mango and banana around the world, and here on Mo’orea is no different. Also available and commercially produced are the sweetest little pineapples. Everywhere you look there are papaya, passion fruit, limes, breadfruit and plantain. Sometimes we can find starfruit, avocado, custard apple and guava.

Fresh Fruit

This abundance of fruit makes it’s way into many local restaurants as well as into our morning breakfast bowl with yogurt.

Agriculture

The island of Mo’orea has both an Agriculture High School and College. Though pineapple is grown commercially it is not exported. Sugar cane is no longer a cash crop, but due to the resurgence of Rum it is being reinstated. Mo’orea has some commercial production of vanilla.

Rum Tasting
Tahitian Vanilla

Today Tahiti exports coconut oil and pearls, with pearls making up the largest export by far and is second in economic impact to the nation to tourism.

Teach a Man to Fish…

Given it’s an island, fish is of course a staple protein. We have been astonished by the inexpensive and delicious red and white ahi. Ahi is served everywhere and is usually the fish enjoyed in the national dish of Tahiti called Poisson Cru. We have eaten Poisson Cru several times now, and have made it ourselves too. Mixing the island favorites of fish, lime and coconut milk with some veg it’s absolutely delicious and served everywhere.

Fresh Ahi

Originally however, Poisson Cru was made with reef fish. Reef fish is still a staple and local fisherman, in small skiff or kayaks fish the reefs every morning for Dorado, Parrot Fish and other small fish that live in the coral. We purchased some small fish right in our front yard and enjoyed cooking them.

Today’s catch
Fresh Dorado with herbs

Sport fishing is also popular here for Big Eye, Wahoo, Marlin and more.

Mo’orea is home to a shrimp farm, producing some of the best shrimp I have ever eaten. I was surprised to find warm water shrimp this tasty. We used the local shrimp for our Kung Pao Shrimp recipe (see above).

Comfort Foods and Carbs

I try to stay away from bread and sweets most of the time, but both are very popular in the daily diet of locals. One such food is Firi Firi, a local donut. Firi Firi is available in road side stands around the island, usually on Sunday morning when families gather. Personally I thought the coconut sugar fried dough was too greasy.

Firi Firi

Something I did really like was a coconut bread we had from the Chinese take out. It was wonderful and is a very popular local treat. On Sundays the Chinese take out is very busy as locals gather their favorites from bao buns to deep fried pork and sweets for family time.

Coconut Bread

Speaking of bread, the French Polynesia government subsidizes baguettes. Which means they are incredibly cheap and abundantly available six days a week, hot from the oven at a cost of 57 cents (USD). We were told this is to make sure everyone can at least afford bread. And boy do the locals eat up those cheap baguettes.

Baguette

At the Polynesian Tiki Village Show we attended, our dinner included the local comfort food of Pua’a, a suckling pig cooked underground. Nearly identical to way it’s done in Hawaii. Also in the same pit was cooked breadfruit, coconut bread and plantains.

Oven for the Pua’a
Pua’a

Street Food Tour

One of the first things we did during our first week in Mo’orea was spend a day with Tahiti Food Tours on a Mo’orea Tama’a Street Food Tour. I love doing these kinds of exploratory tours, to really kick start some knowledge about local cuisine. Our guide Heimata was fabulous and we tasted many different local street foods and the wide variety of different types of outdoor places locals go (see more below about that). Heimata, born on Mo’orea, was the perfect guide to show us the ropes. Some of my favorite things were the local mango sprinkled with plum powder, grilled beef heart, Chinese dumpling, Poisson Cru and homemade ice cream. Our tour also included a stop at the local rum distillery and juice factory.

Mango with Plum Powder
Chinese Dumplings

Local Cooking Class

Heimata also turned us on to the Food and Cook Lab, an organic and locally sourced cooking experience here on Mo’orea. We spent a day with Audrey and Stevenson as well as two American women and a man from France at their beautiful and sustainable kitchens. The class we took was all about using locally sourced foods to make some of the traditional Tahitian dishes. We went out into the garden and dug up manioc root and made manioc chips. They were so delicious. We cooked breadfruit over an open flame and then made amazing Poisson Cru. They taught us to make coconut bread, steamed inside hibiscus leaves. And we also made pumpkin and plantain po’a, which was baked inside banana leaf and is like a pudding. What an amazing experience we had. I liked it so much I have registered for another class coming up to learn about fish!

Wrapping the Po’e
Manioc Chips

These experiences above also opened our eyes to some of the different kinds of food and dining establishments available on the island. We learned about several different categories of dining;

Snack Shops

Called Snacks locally, these are usually take out areas of restaurants, or very small roadside restaurants. On our food tour we visited a couple. My favorite was Snack Rotui right on the water at the head of Cooks Bay (often called First Bay). Snack Rotui is one of the oldest businesses on the island. The food is prepared across the street in a small kitchen and brought over to the road side “snack” by bicycle. Serving a variety of local specialties from quenelles to egg rolls and fish to chicken. Inexpensive and super yummy. We plan to return.

Snack Rotui

On another day we visited another Snack that sold mostly juice, smoothies and homemade jams. I bought some pineapple mint jam which I used on chicken and it was delicious.

Smothies at a Snack

Food Trucks

Known as Roulotte, a French word that describes its mobility, Roulotte’s are everywhere. Not necessarily always “trucks” like we see in the USA, more often trailers. Some of the trailers are set up more permanent with attached covered seating, while others come and go. We noticed Roulottes selling noodles, crepes, whole chicken, pork, steak frits, grilled fish, tacos, and even churros. Our favorite is Kaylakea Moz Food right next door to the Mahana Resort. At Moz we had one grilled tuna and one tuna tartar and both were outstanding. So far the best meal we have enjoyed at this darling little Roulotte and much less expensive than a traditional restaurant.

Kaylakea Moz Food Truck
Grilled Tuna
Tuna Tartar

Fruit Lady

For lack of a better name we call these small ma and pa roadside tables the Fruit Lady. Usually set up in front of someone’s home, these are likely unlicensed operators selling locally sourced fruit and veg and sometimes Firi Firi. We are trying to buy all our fruit and veg from these vendors and support local as much as we can.

Fruits and Veg
at the fruit lady stand

Some of the vendors are at the same spot everyday, while others come and go, particularly the fish vendors who sell out of the back of their car when they have a catch. We have also seen vendors selling Mape, which is a local chestnut and very popular. At one fruit lady stand they also sell lovely leis and flower head pieces.

Traditional Restaurants

Of course there are traditional restaurants too, but they seem less frequent. All the resorts have traditional restaurants and there are several beach side ones as well. Because many business close between mid January and mid February, we are holding out to visit a few on our list. We did have an exceptional (but also expensive) French lunch at Mo’orea Beach Cafe on one of our first days. I had one of the best pieces of fish I have every had (Dover sole) cooked to perfection. The service and view was exceptional too.

Mo’orea Beach Cafe

The Flavors of French Polynesia

We have been on the island of Mo’orea now for three weeks and we have five weeks to go. So we still have lots of time to explore more of the flavors of French Polynesia. Next week we are flying over to Bora Bora for several days. I don’t expect the food to be different, but since we will be staying in a hotel and not in an Airbnb we will be eating out more. So I’ll be in search of the flavors of French Polynesia.

No blog next Friday but I’ll tell you all about Bora Bora the following week.

Thank you for joining me today to learn about the flavors of French Polynesia. We love it when you pin and share our blog. Thank you. Mauruuru!

See our Fifth Annual Travel Awards 2021 here.

See this week’s top performing pin here Best of My Fab Fifties Life 2021

Previous Post Next Post

You may also like

14 Comments

  • Reply Healthy Hungry Cat

    Amazing! You’re so lucky to explore these tropical paradises!

    February 4, 2022 at 8:56 am
    • Reply Laureen

      I know I am. Grateful.

      February 4, 2022 at 9:05 am
  • Reply Michelle

    Amazing! Can’t wait to see what other flavours and dishes you’ll discover 🙂

    February 4, 2022 at 11:42 am
  • Reply Pastor Natalie

    Such a fun post. How wonderful to read all your experiences. The food looks so delicious. It’s wonderful that you were able to experience a cooking class there too. Thank you for sharing.

    Pastor Natalie
    Letstakeamoment.com

    February 4, 2022 at 5:47 pm
  • Reply Alma

    One of the best parts of travel is trying out different flavors and foods. These look delicious! We have noticed how many islands have baguettes for their daily bread – definitely a French influence.

    February 5, 2022 at 2:35 am
    • Reply Laureen

      Gotta love a good baguette!

      February 5, 2022 at 8:27 am
  • Reply Linda (LD Holland)

    I am definitely loving following your great trip to Moorea. It has been on our list for a long time. So interesting to read about all the different influences on the flavours of Moorea. We will always be happy in an area with fresh produce and lots of seafood. We certainly would not go hungry!

    February 5, 2022 at 5:31 am
    • Reply Laureen

      Bon Appetit it’s true!

      February 5, 2022 at 8:28 am
  • Reply Annie

    It is so great to be able to stay in a place long enough to try all these things. The food sounds interesting and healthy as long as you stay away from those doughnuts!

    February 5, 2022 at 10:34 am
  • Reply Heather

    Brilliant post! You had me hungry, fascinated and discovering as I read. So intrigued by the history and the food. Can’t wait to do some day!

    February 5, 2022 at 7:28 pm
    • Reply Laureen

      Thank you Heather!

      February 5, 2022 at 10:31 pm
  • Reply Renee

    It’s so interesting to read about food influences. All of the cuisine looks fresh, healthy and a feast for the senses. But, I have to admit, you had me at Firi Firi, I think at one bite I would be hooked.

    February 7, 2022 at 1:05 am
  • Leave a Reply

    This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.